Review | Spooky Love

25080754

(credit)

Kindle Price: $0.99

Synopsis:

After Margot Green helps move her older sister into the University of Miami dorms, she just wants to go home to New Jersey where she can wallow in her loneliness. Unfortunately for Margot, her parents decide to extend their trip to the Florida Keys where they sign up for a kooky tour of historic Key West. Margot is horrified to have to traipse around hotter-than-Hades Old Town with her embarrassing parents until she meets Sam, an enigmatic local, who convinces her to embark on a spooky adventure that will inevitably lead to discovery and heartache.

ONE NIGHT IS ALL YOU NEED is a 5,000-word YA short story that will appeal to both romance and mystery fans. ”

My Review:

This is a short story so my review is going to be pretty short too. This book was actually really weird. I knew it was a short story, but I didn’t expect it to end as abruptly as it did. I’m still not really sure what I read.

There wasn’t really anything that “spoopy” (spooky) and I was able to see the “plot twist” a mile away. There wasn’t really that much heartache, romance, or mystery either.

Continue reading

Advertisements

The Forever Contract by Avery Sawyer

15785067

(credit)

Kindle Price: Free!

Official Review: 1/5

Synopsis:

In the very near future, the country is plunged into drought and unrest. Scare resources and constant heat are making life completely miserable. Casey doesn’t think she can stand slugging back another gel pack or working one more shift at the wells. Fortunately, there’s a solution: anyone over the age of seventeen can sign the Forever Contract and enter a utopian paradise. While people’s minds take a permanent vacation, their bodies get warehoused and hooked up to a complex array of sensors and feeding tubes. As Casey’s brother says, “You upload your consciousness to the system and you’re free to live as long as you want, however you want. No more pain, no more heat, no more awful dust, no more work. Just pure thought. It’s what our species has always been meant for. Suffering is for philosophers. Not for me.”
Casey’s ready to sign–a permanent vacation is just what she needs. There’s only one problem: her boyfriend James doesn’t trust it.
Told from his and her perspectives, The Forever Contract is a 17,000 word (60 page) novella suitable for readers in grade 8 and above.
Would you sign the contract?

My Review:

The cover of The Forever Contract and the synopsis were both misleading. For the most part, I stay away from books that have covers like that, it usually means certain “special” events occur. None of that happened though, so I’m not sure why Sawyer chose this cover. The synopsis was what pulled me in, but it didn’t quite deliver what I was expecting either. The thought of “upload[ing] your consciousness to the system and you’re free to live as long as you want, however you want.” was intriguing. A unique twist to a dystopian novella. So why didn’t I give it more than one star?

It was completely and totally dull. I was losing my mind trying to get through this novella. Casey, James, and all the other characters were completely one-dimensional. This is one of the biggest issues with novellas: Too complex of a concept crammed into a novella. It almost always leads to poor character development and a poorly delivered plot. If you need more “book time” to develop a solid plot and solid characters than a novella will be able to provide, do not write a novella. It’s unfair to the reader, not just because they may have spent money to buy the book, but in addition, they spent time reading your book only to receive something sub par. It’s equivalent to going to a restaurant and reading over the menu (the books on shelves) and you finally choose something that sounds appetizing (the cover). The chef (author) is making the food in front of you and there are lots of flips and sizzles (the synopsis). Then, your food is finally done and the food is being put on your plate, a little sloppily, but it still looks rather good (the first few chapters). You finally take a bite and your face scrunches in disappointment as your taste buds recoil in horror. It’s undercooked and not what you expected after watching the chef’s grand flips and loud sizzles. But what can you do? You already paid. You wasted your time and money on a chef that did not deliver the service you deserved.

It was honestly a shame because this plot was incredibly amazing. There could have been ocean-deep depth, heartbreaking-ly emotional scenes between James and Casey, gorgeous world-building, and just so much more. There was barely a climax before the ending, the ending just quickly wrapped everything up. It was like those times when you’re having company over soon and you aren’t quite ready and don’t know what to do so you quickly throw things into closets and shove things under couches. I don’t know what happened why Sawyer decided to hastily end The Forever Contract this way but it was inexcusable. It left an appalling amount of uncertainty and was poorly put together. It clearly says “END” in bold letters, but seems to hint at a sequel since it “ends” at a cliffhanger. The Forever Contract has immense potential and I truly mean that. It should definitely not be a novella, but at least a full length novel so that Sawyer can make this plot reach its full potential.

Forgiven (The Trouble series) by Rachel Morgan

21805240[1]

(credit)

Kindle Price: Free!

Official Rating: 1/5

Synopsis:

Three hundred and six days ago, Julia ran away from home. Abandoning her family, friends, boyfriend, and university plans, she fled with no explanation. She can’t hide forever, though, and now it’s time to face the mess she left behind.

My Review:

If you listen very carefully, you can hear me sighing loudly. If you’ve ever been at an amusement park at least once, and I’m sure you have, there’s always that one ride that kind of bothers you. It’s that single ride that has all of those twists and turns, but ends too quickly for the thrill to actually hit you. That’s what Forgiven felt like. Forgiven follows a girl who ran away from home. But she didn’t just run away from home to a town nearby, she ran all the way to London.

I didn’t like this very much, which is surprising since I liked a different book from her that I reviewed, and it’s one of the last few prequels/novellas that I’m probably going to read. The story deals with rape and I don’t appreciate how it presented it. The whole story was based on how a rape was handled the wrong way and it left a bad taste in my mouth. In all honesty, it seemed to me that the book was mainly “romance with a dash of rape to add character.” It would take quite an author to convince me that a story that covers a girl who is raped, can be wrapped up with a cheery ending in seventy-six pages. It wasn’t quite disrespectful (from my limited point-of-view), but it didn’t accurately cover the physical and psychological effects of rape. It just left it all out. (spoiler) One minute she left because she didn’t want to ruin all of the relationships because of what happened and the next she’s completely fine. Maybe she got therapy during her time in London, but if the reader doesn’t know that, then you can’t not include that.
There wasn’t enough time to develop Julia or any of the characters. I couldn’t relate to her, not even remotely, and she was dull. I would be shocked (and I was) to find out that she was the spice to someone’s life. Maybe that’s a bit too harsh, but it was true. I notice that in a lot of “0.5” and novellas and prequels there isn’t a lot of development. It’s never a good idea to write a novella without the intention to have development in it. Even if it’s to provide a tiny bit of background, definitely make those 76 pages worth the time you spent writing it and the time the reader spends reading it.

The Island (The Island series) by Jen Minkman

17825118[1]

(credit)

Official Rating: 1/5

Synopsis:

I walk toward the sea. The endless surface of the water extends to the horizon, whichever way I look.
Our world is small. We are on our own, and we only have ourselves to depend on. We rely on the Force deep within us, as taught to us by our forefathers.
If I were to walk westward from here, I would come across a barrier – the Wall. Behind it, there are Fools. At least, that’s what everyone says.
I have never seen one.

Leia lives on the Island, a world in which children leave their parents to take care of themselves when they are ten years old. Across this Island runs a wall that no one has ever crossed. The Fools living behind it are not amenable to reason – they believe in illusions. That’s what The Book says, the only thing left to the Eastern Islanders by their ancestors.
But when a strange man washes ashore and Leia meets a Fool face to face, her life will never be the same. Is what she and her friends believe about the Island really true?
Or is everyone in their world, in fact, a Fool?

My review:

This book..could you even call it a book? It’s really a fanfiction that got published to be honest. It’s very short and I didn’t enjoy it very much. The synopsis is very misleading. The plot is based around a book called “The Book” which is essentially..wait for it..a retelling of Star Wars. Yes. Star Wars. This is a Star Wars fanfiction.

First off, Leia, our “heroine,” is heartless. When she and her brother, Colin, leave their parents this is how her thoughts play out: “Colin coughs. “I go my own way,” he says with a quiver in his voice. His eyes search our mother’s. “I stand on my own two feet.” A tear rolls down his cheek. He’s having a hard time with this. Oh well.” What? He’s having a hard time leaving his parents at ten years old..that’s perfectly acceptable. What was unacceptable is that Leia didn’t seem upset at all. (spoiler) At one point, her Dad dies. This is her response: “I have gone my own way. I can stand on my own two feet. I don’t need my parents, and they won’t be there for me. The Force is the only thing we can rely on. So why do I feel so terribly sad and empty after hearing this news?” It might be because your Dad died. I don’t know.. the fatherly figure who helped raise you for ten years?

The rest of the characters were boring and unimaginative, except for maybe the Fool (who I think was named Will). He had some potential.

The book was rather short, so my review is short as well. I definitely wouldn’t recommend the book.