The Problem with Crazy by Lauren K. McKellar

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Kindle Price: $2.99

Official Rating: 4.5/5

Synopsis:

The problem with crazy is that crazy, by itself, has no context. It can be good crazy, bad crazy … or “crazy” crazy–like it was when my ex-boyfriend sung about me on the radio.” Eighteen-year-old Kate couldn’t be more excited about finishing high school and spending the summer on tour with her boyfriend’s band. Her dad showing up drunk at graduation, however, is not exactly kicking things off on the right foot–and that’s before she finds out about his mystery illness, certain to end in death. A mystery illness that she could inherit. Kate has to convince everyone around her that her father is sick, not crazy. But who will be harder to convince? Her friends? Or herself? The Problem With Crazy “is a story about love and life; about overcoming obstacles, choosing to trust, and learning how to make the choices that will change your life forever.

My Review:

I wasn’t sure what to expect with The Problem with Crazy. Would it be cliche? Would I hate it? Would it turn out to be just a regular romance story where the main female character has a mere sprinkle of issues? All of these questions were fortunately answered it with a “No.”

Since life has been busy, I’ve been reading books on my iPod’s Kindle, jotting down notes for myself later, and then going back to the book when I get a chance. This keeps me from forgetting how I felt about the book and I can remember what the book was about. When I returned to this book, I still remembered it and so I gave it a 3/5 stars before reading my notes. Upon accessing my notes, I read “…I was near tears…I’m in awe…I give it a full five stars.”

The main character, Kate Tomlinson, has her life figured out. She is graduating high-school and immediately going to travel the world with her boyfriend and his band as she organizes their tour. Then, her plans fall through like an unexpected sinkhole.

There’s is many things and very few things to say about Kate. There’s no doubt that she is a strong main character. She lacked cliches and had honest character development. She responded to the sudden change of events with fear, anger, irritation, like anyone would and I respected that. But she didn’t leave it there, rather than dwelling on the situation indefinitely, she confronted the insecurities that were drawn to the surface with the help of old and new friends. The main issue I had with her was her response to an offer from someone after the final twist at the end. It was, in my opinion, a shallow response and honestly shocking after all that she had been through.

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Star Struck by Jamie Campbell (Review)

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Kindle Price: Free!

Official Review: 5/5

Synopsis:

Melrose Morgan was your typical teenager, flipping burgers and surviving high school the best she could. Yet all that changed after a chance encounter took her face to face with the world’s biggest superstar.
Living every girl’s fantasy, Melrose falls for one fifth of the most successful boy bands on the planet, Cole Newton. He invites her on a date and she can’t help but fall in love with her idol.
But in a world that is full of shining stars, can one small town girl really capture the heart of a supernova? Find out in the first installment of the Star Kissed series.

My Review:

WARNING: NOVELLA/NOVELLETE/SHORT STORY AUTHORS TAKE NOTE

This is a short story done right. After all of the novelettes that I have read, this one has actually felt like it was worth my time. It took me maybe thirty minutes to read; I was bored, it was late, I didn’t want to try to tackle a two-and-a-half-hour book at nine at night so I thought, “Why not?” And as it turns out, that was a really great idea.

I feel that the main issue in novelettes is that authors feel the need to make their characters develop somehow. If you have around seventy pages to impress a reader, you don’t have the time to have a character develop. For the most part, at least. Unless you can write a seventy page book and make it feel like a two hour long action or romantic comedy or adventure movie, don’t try to include character development. That doesn’t go to say that these authors can’t write if they can’t pull that off, far from it, because Campbell can write.

Melrose Morgan isn’t your average teenager working at a fast food joint. It’s obvious that she isn’t, but you aren’t explicitly given a reason why, which was fine. It wasn’t necessary. What I did notice about Melrose, and I’m not sure if it was just placed to add depth or if it was foreshadowing for the next book, was how observant she was about how her sister Jemma was feeling. Even when Melrose wasn’t in the mood to talk, she still made sure that Jemma was okay and if she wasn’t, she spent time with her until she was. When I think about it, that might have been just to add depth, but it added the right amount of depth. It showed me, as a reader, that Melrose wasn’t the type of person to discount a person’s emotions just because they were younger. Instead, she truly cared and did her best to ensure that Jemma knew she cared.

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