The Deepest Red by Miriam Bell

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Kindle Price: $0.99

Official Rating: 0.5/5

Synopsis:

“In a destroyed world of abandoned towns and haunted memories, Millie Daniels lives protected behind the constrictive fences of a long forgotten prison. Her entire life she has longed for two things, to discover the truth behind her mother’s death and to understand the mysteries kept shrouded among the surrounding forest. However, she can not do either alone.

Faced with tragic circumstances in the decaying lands of the red zone, Millie must learn to fight for her survival. Along the way, her reality intertwines with cryptic dreams and dangerous obstacles threatening her life and those she loves. Only a skillful outsider, Connor, born deep within the red zone can help her unlock the buried truth and teach her how to stay alive against the oncoming threats.”

My Review:

POP QUIZ!

What is a NECESSITY to survive?

  1. Water
  2. Food
  3. Shelter
  4. All of the above

 

OH, I’m sorry. If you chose 4), that is incorrect. The correct answer was 5) Sex.

Do I have your attention now? Good.

The Deepest Red was awful. I’m talking if I was grading a book on how awful it was, it would get a A++.

First of all, I can’t stand Millie. What was her problem? She was always panicking about something, the word panic was used 19 times to describe how she felt. Millie was always snapping with anger, and it would somehow give her the ability to do the near impossible. If you’re thinking, Paige, adrenaline is an amazing thing! Yes, that is true, but any time it was convenient, suddenly Millie was super angry about something and she’d become some “amazing” whirlwind of power. I call bull. Her bedside manner was atrocious too. Whenever someone died, Millie would go up to another person and just go “Name is dead.” No words to soften the blow, no sympathetic smiles, literally just “Yeah. Your loved one is gone lol.” She even says it to one guy just so that he’ll do a task faster. How rude!

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Into the Dark by Brian Spangler

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Kindle Price: $4.99

Official Rating: 3/5

Synopsis:

When Emily heard the first scream, she became concerned.
When she heard a second scream, she grew scared.
When she heard the third scream, she was struck with terror.
But it was what Emily could not hear that frightened her the most.

Emily wakes to find that her world has plummeted into darkness–the clouds have spilled out of the sky and taken the sun.
And there is more to the mist than just the dangers of being blind–the fog is poison, killing everything in its path. Their home is no match for the caustic fog, and her family is suddenly running for their lives.
But when she learns that the machines built to save the world could be the cause of the accident, Emily turns to her father–the original architect–with the hope that they can stop the environmental catastrophe. ”

My Review:

Meh. I don’t know how I feel about Into the Dark. This is book 3 of my #MakeMeRead It Readathon (even though it’s only supposed to be for a week). I made very few notes because it was just that kind of book. I can already feel in my reader bones that this review is going to be short, but let’s get started.

Emily Stark is our main character, our female protagonist. Now, notice that I did not say heroine, because truly, there is no “hero(ine)” in this book. I kind of liked Emily, but I wasn’t rooting for her either. I appreciated that Spangler made sure that survival was the first thing on her mind. When she sees the love interest, she questions if she’s allowed to feel infatuation, if it’s wrong given the circumstances. I liked that, because that’s realistic. I feel as if I don’t really know Emily. Sure, we’re in the middle of an apocalypse, so she wouldn’t be thinking about things that don’t really matter anymore, so it’s understandable. Even still, though she isn’t a cardboard character, I don’t really know her.

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Dare to Dream by Carys Jones

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Kindle Price: $4.99

Official Rating: 1/5

Synopsis:

“The world was going to end. Of that, Maggie Trafford was certain.”
Fourteen-year-old Maggie Trafford leads a normal life. Well, as normal as being crammed in a three-bedroom house with four siblings and a single parent can be, anyway. But despite being somewhat ignored at home, Maggie excels, earning top grades, a best friend who would do anything for her, and stolen looks from a boy in Maths.
It’s not until the dreams start that Maggie realizes “normal” is the least of her problems. Every night, she lives the same nightmare—red lightning, shattered glass, destruction. But nightmares are just that, right? No one believes her when she says it’s an omen. At least, not until the already mysterious pillars of Stonehenge start falling.
No longer alone in her fear, Maggie and the world watch with bated breath as one after another, the historic stones tumble, like a clock counting down. But only Maggie knows what it means: when the last stone falls, destruction will reign. And when the world ends, there’s only one option left—survive.
Horrifying and raw, Dare to Dream is equal parts tragedy and hope, detailing the aftermath of apocalyptic catastrophe, the quest for survival, and the importance of belief.

My Review:

Teenaged girl leading a “normal” life? Check. Apocalypse? Check. She’s the key to “it all”? Check. “I must survive!” mentality? Triple check.

“Horrifying and raw, Dare to Dream is equal parts tragedy and hope, detailing the aftermath of apocalyptic catastrophe, the quest for survival, and the importance of belief.” I read this (because it’s the synopsis) and I shrugged my shoulders and thought “Okay, this might be interesting.” Oh, how wrong I was. Dare to Dream wasn’t equal parts tragedy and hope, but a complete tragedy.

I need to talk about Maggie, but before that: This author dedicated this book to her father because “Maggie was always your favorite.” I am by no means making fun of the dedication, that is very sweet. I just had a little chuckle over the fact that Jones made her father’s favorite have an incredibly difficult time throughout the book. Dedication aside, Maggie was annoying.

I was in pain when I read Dare to Dream. It was a colossal waste of time and I’m horrified that it cost actual U.S. dollars to buy. I have to start with Maggie, the “heroine.” What standard was Jones following when she created Maggie? She was whiny, made ridiculous assumptions, and had the emotional capacity of a paperclip. She was barely a character, to the point where I don’t even have much to write about her. It’s the plot and writing that I had the most issue with because can you really criticize a paper clip for having no character?

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