Breaking Rules (Breaking series) by Tracie Puckett

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Official Rating: 2/5

Synopsis:

“Sometimes, the lessons of childhood are damaging enough that, by eighteen, you’ve figured out some rules so you don’t repeat your parents’ mistakes. For Mandy, that meant finishing her last year of high school, going to college, and then returning to small-town Sugar Creek to live a solitary life as a writer.
That was the plan, and her main rule for avoiding complications and staying on track was to never, ever, EVER let someone get too close.
That was before she met Gabe.
And when Gabe starts to awaken emotions she’s never experienced, Mandy suddenly begins to question every belief she’s ever had.
She can’t be falling in love, can she? That would be the biggest mistake of her life, wouldn’t it? Could she break one of her most important rules—for Gabe?”

My Review:

First if all, ugh. This does NOT, I repeat in bold lettering, NOT need to be a series! It doesn’t need to have a sequel! There’s no need! None! Everything could have been cleared up in the first book without the vague mysterious ending. There was barely any plot as it was in the first book. What could the second book possibly have as a plot (based on the ending)? Is Gabe being pursued by the Mafia and is also tied in with the CIA and he has a limp because there’s a microchip in his knee that Russia uses to track him with? I would read it if that was the case and I had better tag this review as a huge spoiler.

Mandy has a list of rules. If these rules are kept then her heart will not be broken and she will live a life of solitude in content. Until one day, Gabe comes along and suddenly she’s breaking one rule…and then them all.

Obviously this was going to be the plot of the book based on the synopsis, but it was written as if the author was as bored as I was while I was reading it. While I like to hear about people getting involved in their community, it was overdone in this book. Yes I understand that it was very important to Mandy, but why did it take over the whole entire story? Plus, if Mandy and Bailey are eighteen, why do their whole lives have to change if their Dad gets a new job? And speaking of their Dad, their Dad still deserves respect and not the utter disrespect that they give to him. If I was Gabe, that would set off warning bells.

The book just had a ton of unnecessary drama and cliche lines, example A: “The moment his fingers touched mine, there was an unexpected spark, a tiny snap that exploded between our hands–something took me by surprise and set my heart off on a wild cadence. I think Gabe felt it, too, because he jerked his hand away and examined the finger where his skin had touched mine…He sat there trying to pretend that spark we’d both felt had been nothing more than static electricity, but I think we both knew better.” Example B: (spoiler) (This is all because they’re moving to California) “I don’t want to hear your explanation,” I yelled louder, and my voice was strained from trying to scream over the roaring thunder. “I don’t want to hear anything you have to say, Gabe. I just want to walk away, go home, and forget I ever knew you.”

Why is Gabe even interested in Mandy? I have yet to figure that out. He’s twenty-one and she’s eighteen. Not a huge age gap, but their maturity levels are very far apart and Mandy’s actions makes it painfully obvious.

There were small errors that could have been easily fixed if a friend had proofread the book. Still, the book wasn’t terrible, just could have been thought out better, but I’m thankful I didn’t spend any money on it.

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